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How to step back and gain perspective





1. YOU HAVE TO STEP BACK

I must remember that I cannot see my ears. If I can digest this fact then I can agree I don’t always see things as they are. Let “Collision” be your guide. If you face collision with other people, circumstances, feelings, relationship etc (which all points to internal conflict) then I must first step back and quiet the conflict. I will never find solution with a disturbed mind.

2. HAVE SOMEONE WHO CAN SEE YOUR EARS

Seeking council with others is a practice as old as time can reach. If you’re doing life by yourself I feel bad for you. An open book policy with one other man/woman in your life will yield countless benefits. I must be able to lay myself out; insecurities and all before another human in order to gain proper perspective. Absolute vulnerability is a treasure chest that continues to give. It never hold back.

3. LOOK IN THE MIRROR

Have to courage to know you are literally the creator of your life. You are 100% responsible for your collision. You are also 100% responsible for practicing a solution. This does not mean that positive constructive action will always feel
comfortable; it won’t. Get used to it.

4. KARMA DOESN’T PUNISH. SHE TEACHES

Wearing this new pair of glasses, move forward and out into action your new solution grounded action. We reap and sow. Reap and sow. The fact that you experienced collision is not a bad thing. You burnt your hand on the stove as to move forward in life not getting further burnt. We create. We learn. We practice. Create. Learn. Practice. Such is the school of life!

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